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Archive for March, 2015


Developer dashboard is very help full while troubleshooting the issues related to performance in SharePoint 2013. 

New-SPUsageApplication -Name “Health and Usage Application” -DatabaseName “SP2013_Health_and_Logging_Database”.

To enable the dashboard, we will use ON setting and use the below powershell command.

$svc = [Microsoft.SharePoint.Administration.SPWebService]::ContentService
$dds = $svc.DeveloperDashboardSettings
$dds.DisplayLevel = “On”
$dds.Update()

Ref: http://www.sharepoint-journey.com/developer-dashboard-in-sharepoint-2013.html

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Group Policy Administrative Template files (ADMX, ADML) 

First download the Files

http://www.microsoft.com/en-us/download/confirmation.aspx?id=35554&6B49FDFB-8E5B-4B07-BC31-15695C5A2143=1

 

To install this download:

  • Download the file by clicking the Download button (above) and saving the file to your hard disk.
  • To use the 32-bit version of the files, double-click the AdminTemplates_32bit.exe program file on your hard disk to start the Setup program.
  • To use the 64-bit version of the files, double-click the AdminTemplates_64bit.exe program file on your hard disk to start the Setup program.
  • Follow the instructions on the screen to complete the installation.

 \ADMX: The ADMX folder contains XML-based versions (.admx or .adml files) of the Administrative Template files for Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, Windows Server 2008 R2, Windows Server 2012, and Windows Server 2012 R2. Administrative Template files are divided into ADMX (language-neutral) and ADML (language-specific) files. By default, the %systemroot%\PolicyDefinitions folder on a local computer stores all ADMX files. ADML files are stored in language-specific folders under the %systemroot%\PolicyDefinitions folder. Each language subfolder contains the .adml files for that language. For example, the English language ADML files would be stored in the %systemroot%\PolicyDefinitions\en-us folder. The following languages are included: Chinese Simplified (People’s Republic of China), Chinese (Hong Kong SAR), English, French, German, Italian, Japanese, Korean, Portuguese (Brazil), Russian, and Spanish. The following files are stored in the \ADMX folder:

            access15.admx

            excel15.admx

            inf15.admx

            lync15.admx

            office15.admx

            onent15.admx

            outlk15.admx

            ppt15.admx

            proj15.admx

            pub15.admx

            spd15.admx

            visio15.admx

            word15.admx

                \en-us: Contains the English language version of the .adml files.

                    access15.adml

                    excel15.adml

                    inf15.adml

                    lync15.adml

                    office15.adml

                    onent15.adml

                    outlk15.adml

                    ppt15.adml

                    proj15.adml

                    pub15.adml

                    spd15.adml

                    visio15.adml

                    word15.adml

 

or

This procedure assumes that you want to manage multiple computers in your domain. In this case, you store the templates in a central store in the Sysvol folder on the primary domain controller. This provides a replicated central storage location for domain Administrative Templates.

 

  1. Create a root-level folder to contain all language-neutral ADMX files. For example, create the root folder for the central store on your domain controller at this location:

%systemroot%\sysvol\domain\policies\PolicyDefinitions

 

  1. Create a subfolder for each language that you’ll use. These subfolders will contain the language-specific ADML resource files. For example, create a subfolder for United States English (EN-US) at this location:

    %systemroot%\sysvol\domain\policies\PolicyDefinitions\EN-US

 

YOU CAN WATCH DETAILS FROM

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nDW7WZiKPbo&hd=1

 

 

REF: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/gg425941.aspx

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Table of Contents

Definitions and cache Types    1

Configuration    1

Monitoring    3

How to monitor Object Cache Performance    3

SharePoint Publishing Cache counter group    3

And this is for Blob It’s the same but readings are different    5

How to monitor ASP.NET ASP.net Output Cache Performance    5

 

SharePoint Caching (Configuration and monitoring)

Definitions and cache Types

SharePoint 2013 provides three types of caches that help improve the speed at which web pages load in the browser: the BLOB cache, the ASP.NET output cache, and the object cache.

  • The BLOB cache is a disk-based cache that stores binary large object files that are used by web pages to help the pages load quickly in the browser.
  • The ASP.NET output cache stores the rendered output of a page. It also stores different versions of the cached page, based on the permissions of the users who are requesting the page.
  • The object cache reduces the traffic between the web server and the SQL database by storing objects such as lists and libraries, site settings, and page layouts in memory on the front-end web server. As a result, the pages that require these items can be rendered quickly, increasing the speed with which pages are delivered to the client browser.

Monitoring consists of regularly viewing specific performance monitors and making adjustments in the settings to correct any performance issues. The monitors measure cache hits, cache misses, cache compactions, and cache flushes. The following list describes each of these performance monitors.

  • cache hit occurs when the cache receives a request for an object whose data is already stored in the cache. A high number of cache hits indicates good performance and a good end-user experience.
  • cache miss occurs when the cache receives a request for an object whose data is not already stored in the cache. A high number of cache misses might indicate poor performance and a slower end-user experience.
  • Cache compaction (also known as trimming), happens when a cache becomes full and additional requests for non-cached content are received. During compaction, the system identifies a subset of the contents in the cache to remove, and removes them. Typically these contents are not requested as frequently.

    Compaction can consume a significant portion of the server’s resources. This can affect both server performance and the end-user experience. Therefore, compaction should be avoided. You can decrease the occurrence of compaction by increasing the size of the cache. Compaction usually happens if the cache size is decreased. Compaction of the object cache does not consume as many resources as the compaction of the BLOB cache.

  • cache flush is when the cache is completely emptied. After the cache is flushed, the cache hit to cache miss ratio will be almost zero. Then, as users request content and the cache is filled up, that ratio increases and eventually reaches an optimal level. A consistently high number for this counter might indicate a problem with the farm, such as constantly changing library metadata schemas.

 

 

Configuration

Object cache 

How to Configure the Object cache settings

  1. Verify that you have the following administrative credentials: You must be a member of the Administrators group on the local computer to configure the object cache settings.
  2. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager.
  3. In Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager, in the Connections pane, click the plus sign (+) next to the server name that contains the Web application, and then click the plus sign next to Sites to view the Web application or applications that have been created.
  4. Right-click the name of the Web application for which you want to configure the disk-based cache, and then click Explore. Windows Explorer opens, with the directories for the selected Web application listed.

     




  5. Right-click web.config, and then click Open.
  6. If the Windows dialog box appears, select Select a program from a list of installed programs, and then click OK.
  7. In the Open With dialog box, click Notepad, and then click OK.
  8. In the Web.config Notepad file, find the following line: <ObjectCache maxSize=”100″ />
  9. To change the size of the cache, type a new number for maxSize. The size is expressed in megabytes (MB), and 100 MB is the default.
  10. Save the Notepad file, and then close it.

Note:

When you save a change to the web.config file, the Web application in Internet Information Services (IIS) 7.0 automatically recycles. This recycling can cause a brief interruption in service to sites contained in that Web application, and users can lose session state. 

Ref: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc770229(v=office.14).aspx

Monitoring

How to monitor Object Cache Performance

You can monitor the effectiveness of the cache settings by using the performance monitors that are listed in the following table.

SharePoint Publishing Cache counter group

The object cache is used to store metadata about sites, libraries, lists, list items, and documents that are used by features such as site navigation and the Content Query Web Part. This cache helps users when they browse to pages that use these features because the data that they require is stored or retrieved directly from the object cache instead of from the content database.

The object cache is stored in the RAM of each web server in the farm. Each web server maintains its own object cache.

You can monitor the effectiveness of the cache settings by using the performance monitors that are listed in the following table.

  • cache hit occurs when the cache receives a request for an object whose data is already stored in the cache. A high number of cache hits indicates good performance and a good end-user experience.

And this is for Blob It’s the same but readings are different

How to monitor ASP.NET ASP.net Output Cache Performance

Applications counter group

 

 

Ref: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff934623.aspx#blob

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