SharePoint Caching (Configuration and monitoring)


Table of Contents

Definitions and cache Types    1

Configuration    1

Monitoring    3

How to monitor Object Cache Performance    3

SharePoint Publishing Cache counter group    3

And this is for Blob It’s the same but readings are different    5

How to monitor ASP.NET ASP.net Output Cache Performance    5

 

SharePoint Caching (Configuration and monitoring)

Definitions and cache Types

SharePoint 2013 provides three types of caches that help improve the speed at which web pages load in the browser: the BLOB cache, the ASP.NET output cache, and the object cache.

  • The BLOB cache is a disk-based cache that stores binary large object files that are used by web pages to help the pages load quickly in the browser.
  • The ASP.NET output cache stores the rendered output of a page. It also stores different versions of the cached page, based on the permissions of the users who are requesting the page.
  • The object cache reduces the traffic between the web server and the SQL database by storing objects such as lists and libraries, site settings, and page layouts in memory on the front-end web server. As a result, the pages that require these items can be rendered quickly, increasing the speed with which pages are delivered to the client browser.

Monitoring consists of regularly viewing specific performance monitors and making adjustments in the settings to correct any performance issues. The monitors measure cache hits, cache misses, cache compactions, and cache flushes. The following list describes each of these performance monitors.

  • cache hit occurs when the cache receives a request for an object whose data is already stored in the cache. A high number of cache hits indicates good performance and a good end-user experience.
  • cache miss occurs when the cache receives a request for an object whose data is not already stored in the cache. A high number of cache misses might indicate poor performance and a slower end-user experience.
  • Cache compaction (also known as trimming), happens when a cache becomes full and additional requests for non-cached content are received. During compaction, the system identifies a subset of the contents in the cache to remove, and removes them. Typically these contents are not requested as frequently.

    Compaction can consume a significant portion of the server’s resources. This can affect both server performance and the end-user experience. Therefore, compaction should be avoided. You can decrease the occurrence of compaction by increasing the size of the cache. Compaction usually happens if the cache size is decreased. Compaction of the object cache does not consume as many resources as the compaction of the BLOB cache.

  • cache flush is when the cache is completely emptied. After the cache is flushed, the cache hit to cache miss ratio will be almost zero. Then, as users request content and the cache is filled up, that ratio increases and eventually reaches an optimal level. A consistently high number for this counter might indicate a problem with the farm, such as constantly changing library metadata schemas.

 

 

Configuration

Object cache 

How to Configure the Object cache settings

  1. Verify that you have the following administrative credentials: You must be a member of the Administrators group on the local computer to configure the object cache settings.
  2. Click Start, point to Administrative Tools, and then click Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager.
  3. In Internet Information Services (IIS) Manager, in the Connections pane, click the plus sign (+) next to the server name that contains the Web application, and then click the plus sign next to Sites to view the Web application or applications that have been created.
  4. Right-click the name of the Web application for which you want to configure the disk-based cache, and then click Explore. Windows Explorer opens, with the directories for the selected Web application listed.

     




  5. Right-click web.config, and then click Open.
  6. If the Windows dialog box appears, select Select a program from a list of installed programs, and then click OK.
  7. In the Open With dialog box, click Notepad, and then click OK.
  8. In the Web.config Notepad file, find the following line: <ObjectCache maxSize=”100″ />
  9. To change the size of the cache, type a new number for maxSize. The size is expressed in megabytes (MB), and 100 MB is the default.
  10. Save the Notepad file, and then close it.

Note:

When you save a change to the web.config file, the Web application in Internet Information Services (IIS) 7.0 automatically recycles. This recycling can cause a brief interruption in service to sites contained in that Web application, and users can lose session state. 

Ref: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc770229(v=office.14).aspx

Monitoring

How to monitor Object Cache Performance

You can monitor the effectiveness of the cache settings by using the performance monitors that are listed in the following table.

SharePoint Publishing Cache counter group

The object cache is used to store metadata about sites, libraries, lists, list items, and documents that are used by features such as site navigation and the Content Query Web Part. This cache helps users when they browse to pages that use these features because the data that they require is stored or retrieved directly from the object cache instead of from the content database.

The object cache is stored in the RAM of each web server in the farm. Each web server maintains its own object cache.

You can monitor the effectiveness of the cache settings by using the performance monitors that are listed in the following table.

  • cache hit occurs when the cache receives a request for an object whose data is already stored in the cache. A high number of cache hits indicates good performance and a good end-user experience.

And this is for Blob It’s the same but readings are different

How to monitor ASP.NET ASP.net Output Cache Performance

Applications counter group

 

 

Ref: https://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ff934623.aspx#blob

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