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Archive for the ‘Sharepoint 2013’ Category


  • Go to the Office 365 admin portal
  • Open the SharePoint admin center
  • On the left choose user profiles
  • Manage User Profiles


Manage User Profiles

  • Find the user you would like to have access to
  • Open the item menu of the user
  • Manage site collection owners


Administrative Access OneDrive for Business Manage User Profiles Item Menu

  • Add your administrator account


OneDrive for Business Site Collection Admin

After executing the steps above, you will see all files and folders for the current user:


Administrative access OneDrive for Business

http://www.eugenedauphin.com/2015/01/get-administrative-access-onedrive-business-environment-user/

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Update the OneDrive for Business sync app

We’re continuously improving the OneDrive for Business sync app, so it’s important to keep your sync app updated.

The steps to do this depend on whether you installed Office or the OneDrive for Business sync app through a setup program (MSI), or through Click-to-run.

This article is not about the OneDrive for Business Next Generation Sync Client. The processes here update the existing OneDrive for Business sync client.

To find out about updating to the Next Generation Sync Client, please see Transition from the existing OneDrive for Business sync client.

NOTE: If you have Office 2010, install Service Pack 2.

How do I tell how Office or the OneDrive for Business sync app was installed?

If you’re an Office 365 for business user and you installed Office applications through Click-to-run, your OneDrive for Business sync app stays up-to-date as long as you don’t disable automatic updates. Follow these steps to determine whether your Office applications were installed through Click-to-run.

  • In an Office app, such as Word, choose File > Account or Office Account (depending on your version of Office).

    NOTE: If you don’t have any Office applications other than OneDrive for Business, your OneDrive for Business installation should update automatically.

  • In the Product Information section, review the Office Updates section, and look for one of the following:


  1. Go to Control Panel.
  2. Under Programs, choose Uninstall programs.
  3. Under Uninstall or change a program, select Microsoft OneDrive for Business 2013, and then chooseChange.


  4. In the How would you like to repair your Office programs dialog box, select Online Repair, and then chooseRepair.


  5. In the Ready to start an Online Repair dialog box, choose Repair to start the process.

    Run Windows Update for a traditional setup (MSI) installation

    If your Office apps were installed by the traditional setup installation, you can use Windows Update, which is available from Control Panel. Learn more about Windows Update.


    Verify that you have the latest version of the OneDrive for Business sync app installed

    You can check for the latest release number of Office on the Update Office 2013 or Office 365 page. Next, you can check for the same version of the sync app in your file system. For the OneDrive for Business sync app, the file name is groove.exe.

  • If you installed Office through an MSI, you usually find groove.exe
    at \Program Files\Microsoft Office\Office15.
  • If you installed Office or the OneDrive for Business sync app through Click-to-run, you usually find groove.exe at \Program Files\Microsoft Office 15\root\Office15.

    Follow these steps to check the version of the sync app installed on your computer.



  1. Search for groove.exe on your PC.


  2. Right-click or tap and hold groove.exe, and choose Properties.
  3. In the Properties dialog box, choose the Details tab, and you’ll see the Product version listed.


  4. Compare your product version with the latest version listed on the Update Office 2013 or Office 365 page. If your product version doesn’t match, use one of the methods described earlier in this article to update it.

    Ref: https://support.office.com/en-us/article/Update-the-OneDrive-for-Business-sync-app-49771c73-e7ad-4d26-bff1-50bb12a83817#runwindowsupdate

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Office 365 sign-in for Yammer

Use your Office 365 credentials to sign in to Yammer 

Go to your office 365 admin center https://portal.office.com/AdminPortal/Home#/homepage

Then choose SharePoint

 

 

 

 

    
 

 

 

 

This is the situation now before enabling the yammer.com feature there is now office 365 log in

 

SharePoint admin center

And check the Use Yammer.com
Service radio button

Now you can go to yammer website

https://www.yammer.com/companyname.com/#/home

change the company name with your domain name

And then go to network Admin

 

 

Now the option is there

 

Check the enforce office 365 identity in yammer

Make sure to notify users cause all users will be logged out and they will have to re login again using the office 365 account

 

After you accept you will have a new option for blocking users how don’t have yammer license

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Use your Office 365 credentials to sign in to Yammer

 

 

Office 365 sign-in for Yammer

Use your Office 365 credentials to sign in to Yammer

Go to your office 365 admin center https://portal.office.com/AdminPortal/Home#/homepage

Then choose SharePoint

one

 

 

 

This is the situation now before enabling the yammer.com feature there is now office 365 log in

two.png

SharePoint admin center

And check the Use Yammer.comService radio button

three.png

Now you can go to yammer website

https://www.yammer.com/companyname.com/#/home

change the company name with your domain name

And then go to network Admin

four.png

 

Now the option is there

five.png

Check the enforce office 365 identity in yammer

Make sure to notify users cause all users will be logged out and they will have to re login again using the office 365 account

six.png

 

After you accept you will have a new option for blocking users how don’t have yammer license

seven.png

 

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Unable to update this object because the following attributes associated with this object have values that may already be associated with another object in your local directory services: [UserPrincipalName username@Domain.com;]. Correct or remove the duplicate values in your local directory. Please refer to http://support.microsoft.com/kb/2647098 for more information on identifying objects with duplicate attribute values.

First run the LDP tool

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2641663

then

  • Connect to Office 365 by using the Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell. To do this, follow these steps:

  • Click Start, click All Programs, click Windows Azure Active Directory, and then click Windows Azure Active Directory Module for Windows PowerShell.

  • Type the following commands in the order in which they are presented, and press Enter after each command:

    $cred = get-credential

    Note When you are prompted, enter your Office 365 administrator credentials.

    Connect-MSOLService –credential $cred

    Leave the console window open. You will have to use it in the next step.

  • Check for the duplicate userPrincipalName attributes in Office 365. In the console connection that you opened in step 2, type the following commands in the order in which they are presented, and press Enter after each command:

    $userUPN = “<search UPN>”

    Note In this command, the placeholder“<search UPN>” represents the UserPrincipalName attribute that you recorded in step 1f.

    get-MSOLUser –UserPrincipalName $userUPN | where {$_.LastDirSyncTime -eq $null}

    Leave the console window open. You will use it again in the next step.

  • Check for duplicate proxyAddresses attributes. In the console connection that you opened in step 2, type the following commands in the order in which they are presented, and press Enter after each command:

     

     

    $SessionExO = New-PSSession -ConfigurationName Microsoft.Exchange -ConnectionUri https://outlook.office365.com/powershell-liveid/ -Credential $Cred -Authentication Basic –AllowRedirection

     

     

    For each proxy address entry that you recorded in step 1f, type the following commands in the order in which they are presented, and press Enter after each command:

    $proxyAddress = “<search proxyAddress>”

    Ref:https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/kb/2641663

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Exchange 2013 Monitoring Mailboxes

Introduction

Exchange Server 2013 introduced a new feature called Managed Availability, which is a built-in monitoring system with self-recovery capabilities. Managed Availability performs continuous tests (probes) that simulate end-user actions, to detect possible problems with Exchange components or their dependencies. If probes are failing, it performs gradual simple recovery actions to bring the affected component in healthy state. It uses special type of mailboxes, called Monitoring Mailboxes or health mailboxes, to simulate end-user kinds of tests.

The life cycle of monitoring mailboxes is taken care entirely by Managed Availability components.

In this post, we’ll see how Managed Availability takes care of monitoring mailboxes, what best practices to keep monitoring mailboxes happy are and some related troubleshooting.

Monitoring Mailboxes

Functioning of Managed Availability is implemented by Microsoft Exchange Health Manager Service running on each Exchange Server 2013 role.

The Microsoft Exchange Health Manager Service is responsible for creating and maintaining monitoring mailboxes

Let’s take a look at how the Health Manager creates them!

How do we create monitoring mailboxes?

The MS Exchange Health Manager Service runs in two processes, MSExchangeHMHost.exe and MSExchangeHMWorker.exe (let’s call it the HM worker).

HM worker process, at the time of startup, checks for availability of monitoring mailboxes and creates monitoring mailboxes as needed.

Starting with Exchange Server 2013 Cumulative Update 1, accounts for monitoring mailboxes are created under following container in the domain Exchange server resides:

<ADdomain>\Microsoft Exchange System Objects\Monitoring Mailboxes

Example:


The logic HM worker process uses to detect and create monitoring mailboxes depends on Exchange Cumulative Update (CU) installed, Exchange role installed on the box and mailbox databases present.

The Following logic was used to create monitoring mailboxes for Exchange Server 2013 servers between RTM to Cumulative Update 5:

  • One monitoring mailbox per mailbox database copy, plus one for all of CAS servers.

Here’s an example of monitoring mailboxes created on Exchange Server 2013 SP1 server that hosts both CAS and mailbox role:

Get-Mailbox -Monitoring | ft displayname,whencreated -AutoSize

[PS] C:\>Get-Mailbox -Monitoring | ft displayname,whencreated 
DisplayName                                         WhenCreated 
———–                                         ———–
HealthMailboxb285a119be6649b3a89574f078e947f5      11/10/2014 9:07:29 AM 
HealthMailbox60d8a8d1285e41bfa5ce1ef1fb93d14e      11/10/2014 9:07:36 AM

The display name of the monitoring mailbox created for database copy contained the GUID of the mailbox database for which it was created.

Example:


The display name of the monitoring mailbox created for CAS server contained the GUID of the Exchange server for which it was created.

Example:


http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2015/03/20/exchange-2013-monitoring-mailboxes.aspx

 

 

Exchange 2013 uses Managed Availability to monitor it’s own health.  A key part of this monitoring is the use of synthetic transactions which mimic user activity such as sending and receiving Email.  As you can imagine, this activity needs to come from and get to somewhere, which is where the Health Mailbox comes into play.  The Health Mailbox is, for all intents and purposes, just like a normal mailbox with an Active Directory account.  There have been a few changes in the Health Mailbox architecture since RTM, namely the location of the AD accounts, the naming convention and the amount of Health Mailboxes created.

Active Directory Location

In RTM we created the Health Mailboxes in Contoso/Users.  I would love to you show you a pretty picture here, but I don’t have an RTM lab and I don’t feel like building a new forest just for one screenshot.  Close your eyes and it should come to you.

In CU1 we created a dedicated home for these objects, as per below:


http://blogs.technet.com/b/admoore/archive/2015/03/11/exchange-2013-health-mailboxes.aspx

 

 

 

How to re-create monitoring mailboxes (NOT considered regular maintenance!)

The mailbox database removal doesn’t cleanup the AD user account associated with monitoring mailboxes. This can then result in orphaned AD user accounts. This happens because of deny permission inherited on Monitoring Mailboxes container. KB article 3046530has details on this, as well as the workaround to resolve it.

If there are too many orphaned monitoring mailbox accounts, you may want to re-create them.

Steps:

1) Make sure “Monitoring Mailboxes” container is present

  • Open Active Directory Users & Computers
  • Click on View and select “Advanced Features”
  • The Browse to Microsoft Exchange System Objects
  • Verify the presence of the “Monitoring Mailboxes” container.

Example:


If the Monitoring Mailboxes container is missing:

  • Make sure you have Exchange Server 2013 CU1 or above installed.
  • Perform PrepareAD with the Exchange Server 2013 version installed.

2) Stop the “Microsoft Exchange Server Health Manager” service on all Exchange Server 2013 servers.

3) Open Exchange Management Shell and use following command to disable existing health mailboxes:

Get-Mailbox -Monitoring | Disable-Mailbox

4) Go back to Active Directory users & computers, right click on domain and search for “HealthMailbox”



5) Delete the health mailbox user accounts.

6) Wait for AD replication or force AD replication.

7) Start the “Microsoft Exchange Server Health Manager” on all Exchange Server 2013 servers.

 

 

Ref: http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2015/03/20/exchange-2013-monitoring-mailboxes.aspx

 

 

 

Best practices

Here are some best practices regarding management of user accounts associated with monitoring mailboxes as well as mailboxes themselves:

  • Do not apply third party customized password policies to user accounts of monitoring mailboxes
  • Exclude monitoring mailboxes from user account lockout policies
  • Do not move the user accounts out from the Monitoring Mailboxes container
  • Do not change the user account properties, like restricting password change etc.
  • Do not change AD permission inheritance
  • Since HM worker handles password resets for monitoring mailboxes, in a large environment, it is normal to see increased password reset traffic for monitoring mailbox accounts; note that doing one of the things above might increase the frequency of those resets
  • Do not move the monitoring mailboxes between mailbox databases
  • Do not apply mailbox quotas to monitoring mailboxes
  • If applying a retention policy, ensure the data within the monitoring mailbox is retained for a minimum of 30 days before being deleted

If you see a mailbox size increasing significantly
for specific monitoring mailbox; you can simply disable the specific mailbox. The HM worker will create a new mailbox at next startup.

http://blogs.technet.com/b/exchange/archive/2015/03/20/exchange-2013-monitoring-mailboxes.aspx

 

Common Issues

So now we know a bit more about the Health Mailboxes, lets look at two common issues.

1. “Corrupt” Health Mailboxes.  We often hear this term, and it seems to come from the error message which is sometimes shown when you run Get-Mailbox -Monitoring.  “/HealthMailboxXXXXXXXXX has been corrupted, and it’s in an inconsistent state. The following validation errors happened: Database is mandatory on UserMailbox”.So what does this mean, and is the mailbox really “corrupted”?  Well, no, not really.  What has actually happened is that this Health Mailbox has the database it corresponds to deleted.  It is therefore “orphaned” and will throw up this error.  This can often happen when admins install a new server, which gets a database created by default, and this is then removed and the clean-up piece doesn’t happen properly.  The AD account is still there, but the mailbox is gone and the database attribute is empty.  These can (and should) be safely removed from Active Directory. It may be prudent to restart the Health Manager service on the affected server, too, just in case any probes are referencing them.

2. Account Lockouts. How on earth can a “system” mailbox account get locked out?  Well, as I said, for all intents and purposes, you can look at these Health Mailboxes as normal mailboxes with a corresponding AD account.  They have passwords which are periodically reset.  The password is a random 128 character secure string, so if you have any kind of domain password policy which could affect that, then it’s possible to cause issues when the passwords are reset on the Health mailbox accounts.  It is best practice to make sure /Monitoring Mailboxes is not included in ANY domain password policies (including lockouts).  You can view password change/failure activity from the following log:

 

…\Exchange Server\V15\Logging\Monitoring\Monitoring\MSExchangeHMWorker\ActiveMonitoringTraceLogs

 

http://blogs.technet.com/b/admoore/archive/2015/03/11/exchange-2013-health-mailboxes.aspx

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Steps to Disable Managed Availability in Exchange 2013 for few Health Checks

 

 

Managed availability is one of the best feature which is been introduced and it’s an excellent feature from Exchange 2013. By using this feature it’s very easy for monitoring the Exchange servers without adding any monitoring software pack like SCOM and few more.

In addition to this it also has the capability to resolve the issues by its own if it finds something wrong on any of the Exchange Functionality. Also it drops an email to the Health mailbox and specified mailbox (administrators) if in case the solution is unidentified by Managed Availability.

In a real time scenario it’s very useful in monitoring the Exchange servers in all aspects and definitely reduces the impact of the exchange servers from any disaster by its own. There can be few scenarios where there can be additional monitoring software’s installed on the servers  and in those cases we can disable the Managed Availability if at all we do not need the report to be generated twice for the same alert.

Also in case of few servers in organization which is running on low memory can also be disabled since it queries, polls hundreds of health metrics as it could consume extra memory.

Also it collects few logs and data by default which is present in the below location which occupies some disk space  depending upon each environment which should be considered for low hard disk space servers as well.

Note:

It’s not  recommended to disable the Managed Availability until and unless there is any specific reason to be done because we will be losing this excellent monitoring feature available in Exchange 2013 at no additional cost.

 

Here is how to disable the managed availability

 

 

 

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/wiki/contents/articles/24038.steps-to-disable-managed-availability-in-exchange-2013-for-few-health-checks.aspx

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